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U.S. ports say tariff retaliation could cut shipping trade

New York - Officials at big U.S. trade gateways say they’re worried new restrictions on steel and aluminum imports could have sweeping impacts on industries that rely on those raw materials, paring back the flow of an even wider range of goods through ports.

New York - Officials at big U.S. trade gateways say they’re worried new restrictions on steel and aluminum imports could have sweeping impacts on industries that rely on those raw materials, paring back the flow of an even wider range of goods through ports. Automobile and auto-parts manufacturers in the Southeast rely heavily on the Port of Charleston for importing components and exporting finished products, said Jim Newsome, chief executive of the South Carolina State Ports Authority.
“To the extent that this might hurt car manufacturing, that’s not good,” Mr. Newsome said Friday. “Global trade has been a big benefit for our country, and anything that would slow that down I don’t think is good at all.” Port authorities also expressed concern over possible retaliatory measures that could be taken by trading partners overseas. In a statement, Don Meyer, co-head of the Northwest Seaport Alliance—made up of the ports of Seattle and Tacoma, Wash.—said retaliatory actions could hurt the region’s agriculture and manufacturing exporters.
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