Top global traders push to cut shipping emissions

Some of the world’s biggest commodities and energy players launch an initiative to cut and track emissions from the ships they charter as efforts intensify to reduce the maritime industry’s carbon footprint

Container ships and bulk freighters are pictured in the shipping lanes off the coast of Singapore

di Jonathan Saul

London - Some of the world’s biggest commodities and energy players on Wednesday launched an initiative to cut and track emissions from the ships they charter as efforts intensify to reduce the maritime industry’s carbon footprint.
 
About 90% of world trade is transported by sea, and the UN shipping agency - the International Maritime Organization (IMO) - aims to reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions by 50% from 2008 levels by 2050.
 
Carbon emissions from shipping rose in the six-year period to 2018 and accounted for 2.89% of the world’s CO2, the latest IMO-commissioned study showed, mounting pressure on the industry to bring levels down.
 
Under the Sea Cargo Charter, 17 companies, including agrigroups Cargill, ADM and Bunge, oil majors Royal Dutch Shell and Total and mining group Anglo American will publicly disclose annually whether their overall ship chartering activities are aligned with IMO 2050 goals.
 
“People buying voyage freight will start asking the question what emissions were actually tagged to this voyage and that is a question that was really not asked before,” Jan Dieleman, president of Cargill’s ocean transportation division, told Reuters.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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