ECSA wants Shipping back in COP21 deal

Brussels - European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA) Thursday calledfor shipping emissions to be added back into climate change documents being drafted by the United Nations as part of the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) climate talks

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Brussels - European Community Shipowners’ Associations (ECSA) Thursday called for shipping emissions to be added back into climate change documents being drafted by the United Nations as part of the 21st Conference of Parties (COP21) climate talks. The group highlighted the fact that text on addressing emissions from the shipping and aviation sectors had been included in previous drafts of climate change documents, but as Ship & Bunker previously reported, was left out of the version released on Wednesday. “We firmly believe that deleting any reference to shipping... is a missed opportunity - said Patrick Verhoeven, ECSA Secretary General -. “We firmly believe that deleting any reference to shipping... is a missed opportunity Patrick Verhoeven, ECSA Secretary General “efforts at IMO and EU level can only be bolstered by a clear signal from the highest UN instance on climate change. We sincerely hope that negotiating parties will seriously reconsider and heed our call for shipping to be reintroduced in the final climate agreement,” Verhoeven added.

Verhoeven described the COP21 talks as a “unique opportunity” to prompt member States of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) to act decisively on shipping emissions. ECSA pointed out that IMO has already made some progress in addressing shipping emissions, including rules aimed to make all ships constructed after 2025 be 30 percent more efficient than those built in the 2000s.

However, ECSA said that IMO’s efforts are “far from completed”, and called for additional measures such as a system of data collection from individual vessels to be established “as soon as possible.” Last month green groups Seas At Risk, Transport & Environment (T&E) and the Marine Conservation Society called emissions from shipping, along with aviation, the “elephant in the COP21 negotiations room.”

(Source: Ship & Bunker)

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